How do you visit the Great Barrier Reef, a true wonder of the world that is 2,300km long?

That’s a natural wonder the same length from Vancouver to the Mexican border, consisting of 900 islands and 2,900 individual reefs. Yep, it’s the world’s largest coral reef and the largest living structure on the planet. So amazing it can be seen from outer space.

Yes. Any wonder it’s a wonder.

Considering all the travel Craig and I have done over the years it’s also a wonder it took us nearly 40 years to experience one of our countries natural icons.

It’s been at the top of our bucket list for years and we were determined to experience it in the best way we could with our kids on this road trip around Australia.

I wasn’t sure if The Great Barrier Reef would match it’s hype, but it did, in a less glamorous but more curious and awe-inspiring way.

We’d just pulled up in the middle of the ocean at Marine World on the Outer Great Barrier Reef. We were on one of the day tours from Cairns and it was windy and choppy and there was a bit of a swell – not the calm, pristine conditions I’d seen in the brochure.

I felt a little sinking fear and disappointment thinking I wouldn’t even see this magical world under the ocean because there was no way I was getting in.

It all looked a little too out of my comfort zone.

Kalyra grabbed my hand, “Come on Mum, let’s go.“ She’s not even a confident or strong swimmer. Of course I could not let her go on her own, so on the count of three we held hands and slipped off the edge and onto the reef.

Snorkeling the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

Wow.

We turned to each other under the water giving thumbs up, holding hands and pointing out parrot fish eating at the coral and giant purple clams.

It was a moment.

It’s a good thing a snorkel was in my mouth as I had no words that could describe how wonderful it felt to be swimming above brightly coloured coral and rainbow coloured fish with stripes and spots, snouts and outs, beaks and flapping fins.

A great big Maori Wrasse called “Wally” swam right up to the snorkelers as soon as we dived in the water.

He was smiling to see the return of his daily friends and his body twisted and snaked between our legs, his big lips pouting in front of our faces as he came up for a peak.

Kalyra and I squealed as we saw him approach. At this stage I was still trying to get over the awe-struck feeling I had about my six-year-old daughter.

Then she pried herself away to snorkel on her own.

It blew me away how confident she was and I soon let go of my fear to just enjoy myself. Even when we swam on the outskirts of the reef over the deeper water she kept beaming and pointing and not letting the abyss scare her as much as it scared me.

Which Great Barrier Reef tours are best?

There are many different options to experience the Great Barrier Reef and from various locations along the Queensland coast.

First, let’s talk about the main gateway to the reef – Cairns!

We’d been in Cairns for about a week and were researching day tours. We asked some locals at the Caravan Park we were staying at, checked in with our facebook community and jumped online to Trip Advisor do more research.

We’d always wanted to go to the Outer Reef, because that’s where the best snorkeling and diving is. You might only visit the Reef once, you will want to see it at it’s best!

Tours range from small boats where you dive or snorkel off the boat, to bigger tours where you moor at a pontoon and from there participate in many different activities.

The pontoon experience

Because we have two young kids, Kalyra was six at the time and Savannah only two, we decided the pontoon experience would be most practical. We didn’t fancy being stuck on a boat all day with our young ones, it would have been stressful and gaining access to the water would have been tricky.

We chose the pontoon experience at Marina World based out at Moore Reef with Reef Magic Tours. After researching, we’d heard they were probably the best for families. The family price was going to cost us $495, but hey it’s the Great Barrier Reef and it’s Australia.

The pontoon was a great choice.

After our 90-minute high-speed catamaran ride out from Cairns our vessel moored at Marine World and we jumped on the pontoon.

It gave us all room to move around without being confined to a boat. Plus the stairs that lead down from the main deck to a submerged snorkel platform allow you to sit down and put on your mask and fins, making it easy to slide into the water.

The all-weather Marine World platform caters for all activity levels and was a great base for the day.

We had our own table and chairs on the sundeck, use of fresh water showers and changing rooms and lockers, and a yummy morning/afternoon tea plus a full buffet lunch.

The best part was the confidence Kalyra got by snorkeling in the sheltered coral lagoon. The snorkel area is supervised at all times, they had snorkeler rest stations scattered around if you needed a break in the water, and we could clearly see the bottom at all times.
Introductory Scuba Dive

If’ you’re going to visit the Great Barrier Reef you’ve gotta do a dive right?!

Craig decided this was a once-in-a-lifetime moment and put his hand up for an introductory dive. This was going to be only his second time ever diving, his first being another introductory dive two years ago at Shelley Beach in Manly, Sydney.

On the way out to Marine World, his instructor introduced the equipment and briefed him on the basics of scuba diving.

For $125 he got a 30-minute dive with an instructor and just one other person. Intro dives have no more than 4 people per instructor making it reassuring for any first timers.

He loved it.

His dive reached a maximum of about 8 metres but was mostly hovering around the 4-5 metre level in the beautiful coral lagoon, a sheltered area with dense coral cover and a ton of fish life, including some time swimming with big WALLY!

“It’s another world down there, I can definitely see the addiction to diving” he beamed.

Of course he had to take the compulsory selfie:

Not only did we snorkel and dive, but we were able to see more of the reef on a glass bottom boat and a semi-sub.

The semi-sub gave me the closest thing to a dive experience. Getting closer to the outer part of the reef where all the big schools of fish were was awesome without me being in the water worried about the sharks waiting to eat the big schools of fish!

We loved our family day out on the reef.

For those who want to stay dry Marine World also has an underwater observatory or you can kick back on the sundeck and maybe get a little pampering from the only reef-based massage therapist.

Even though little Savannah is too young to snorkel she had a little swim and could paddle in the purpose built toddler area attached to the side of Marine World.

If you or your family are heading to Cairns Marine World is a great option. Besides what we did Reef Magic Cruises also have an adventure snorkel safari and certified diving packages.

The other major tour operators out of Cairns include Quicksilver and Reef Experience.
The Great Barrier Reef Islands

It’s not just about the beauty of what’s under the water, but the islands that are a part of the Great Barrier Reef – many of which have been created by the coral itself.

It’s worth exploring some of the islands to get the whole experience. Here are a few other Great Barrier Reef Islands that we’ve explored.
Green Island

We also spent the day on Green Island before doing the Marine World experience, located 45 minutes by boat from Cairns.

It’s a sand island and is great for a relaxing day and for families. This was the first place Kalyra snorkeled and she loved seeing a few fish and sting rays!

You can snorkel straight off the shore and we felt the area near the jetty was much better than snorkelling off the patrolled beach. There’s also a nice boardwalk through the forest to the other side of the island, and whilst the kiddies played in the water I enjoyed a massage.

There are three daily departure times and our family ticket cost us $215 and we went with Great Adventures.
Whitsunday Islands

I think the best islands of the Great Barrier Reef region are in the Whitsundays. How can you compete with world famous Whitehaven Beach which consistently ranks as one of the top 5 beaches in the world by Trip Advisor?

The photos don’t even really show how amazingly beautiful it is when you are standing in the softest, purest, whitest sand on the planet.
Whitehaven Beach – Whitsunday Islands, Queensland, Australia

There’s pretty good snorkelling around the islands as well at Langford Island, Maureens Cove and Manta-Ray Bay.
Hayman Island

If you’ve got deep pockets and want a bit of rock star experience, stay at Hayman Island. Just ensure you arrive by helicopter via Whitehaven Beach, an unforgettable moment. You can also access famous “Heart Reef” from Hayman.
Daydream Island

There is, of course, Daydream Island off Airlie Beach, which many consider a bit kitsch, but even though we only stayed for 24 hours I really liked it. It’s a definite family or couples resort holiday that will give you nothing but fun activities, beautiful scenery, and relaxation.

In just 24 hours we did snorkeling, paddle boarding, kayaking and got close up with sting rays and baby sharks at their education centre. The sunsets are pretty spectacular too!

I’m all for it.

If you’re looking to experience the Great Barrier Reef, don’t wait 40 years like we did. With the way the environment is going and the role of Governments, it may have already seen it’s best days.

We can’t wait to go back and do more diving and snorkeling.
Source: www.ytravelblog.com/the-great-barrier-reef-tours-from-cairns/
Image: i.huffpost.com

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